Anne is increasingly in demand as an interpreter and performer of new music. Since her earliest encounters in this field, she has relished the challenge and excitement of studying and presenting contemporary works. Anne collaborates regularly with composers across a variety of disciplines, enjoying exploring the mechanics of their music and helping to bring their ideas to reality. In this section of the website you can find information on Anne’s various past, current and prospective new music projects, as well some practical advice on writing for the harp.

Anne on the importance of contemporary music in all its forms, and the role that the harp has to play:

Tuning before Nonclassical’s Battle of the Bands // January 2014 // ©Dimitri Djuric

Tuning before Nonclassical’s Battle of the Bands // January 2014 // ©Dimitri Djuric

 

“Contemporary music is the music written for our time: it relates to the trends, ideologies and     world events witnessed in the last century, and creates relevant resonances that the older canon cannot. It is the creative voice of those composers and artists with whom we live and work today, and as such deserves committed artistic investment. There are many stereotypes that get between audiences and contemporary classical music; I think we should be presenting performances that challenge ideas and make it as easy as possible for people to engage with this inspiring music, without compromising our collective artistic integrity. It is a tricky path, but one that we must tread for the sake of ongoing artistic creativity and production.

I passionately believe that the harp has a central role to play in contemporary music, from experimental classical, dubstep and popular music, to cross-cultural collaborations. This is truly an amazingly versatile and powerful instrument, that for far too long has suffered under the burdens of stereotypes and mechanical limitations. The harp should be (and is gradually becoming) one of the best multi-purpose tools for composers, orchestrators and producers. But there is still a long way to go.”